Differentiated instruction key to large classroom gains

Differentiation is the goal for classroom instruction, but admittedly not easy to do—unless you have Renaissance Accelerated Math®, says John Daffron who teaches second and third grade at Newport Heights Elementary School in Newport Beach, California.

“With Accelerated Math, you have a differentiated math program for every student—one so individualized that every strength and weakness is clearly defined and can be acted on immediately,” Daffron said. "The amount of feedback and the daily interaction with each child make it impossible for anyone to fall through the cracks."

With Accelerated Math, you have a differentiated math program for every student—one so individualized that every strength and weakness is clearly defined and can be acted on immediately. The amount of feedback and the daily interaction with each child make it impossible for anyone to fall through the cracks.

John Daffron | Second- & Third-Grade Teacher | Newport Heights Elementary School

Certainly, that’s the case in Daffron’s math class. In the 2009-10 school year, 100 percent of Daffron’s third graders scored Proficient or Advanced in math on the California Standards Test (CST). Of the 22 students, 18 scored Advanced and 3 earned perfect scores.

“I know on the fly if they understand the material or not, and I can follow up with more instruction, or take them to Tier 2 intervention for help and later roll them back into the system,” Daffron said.

Anything he might not see on the fly is flagged on Accelerated Math’s Diagnostic and Status of the Class Reports, which Daffron refers to regularly to make sure all students are staying at their normal pace and no one is slipping behind.

Daffron says that Accelerated Math promotes student enthusiasm by providing motivation, as well as active engagement. They love the process of working independently, entering their scores with the handheld responder, going to the computer and getting instant feedback, then connecting with Daffron for kudos or areas of improvement.

“Everything comes together in a perfect storm,” Daffron said. “They love feeling that they are old enough to have some responsibility for their own learning.”

Return to Success Stories page »